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Home Learning Policy

Home Learning policy

 

Aims when setting home learning

  • To develop an effective partnership between home and school.

  • To consolidate and develop understanding of skills covered in school.

  • To extend school learning.

  • To encourage pupils as they get older to develop the self-discipline needed for independent study.

     

Definition of home learning

  • Work or tasks completed out of school, overseen or aided by parents/carers.

  • It should be regular.

  • It should be manageable.

  • It should be purposeful and relevant.

  • It should be monitored and feed-back given to parents or children.

  • It is not an attempt to catch-up with the rest of the class (unless in exceptional circumstances).

     

Home Learning may take the form of:-

  • Reading regularly for enjoyment.

  • Practising spelling patterns.

  • Learning times tables.

  • Extending maths skills through activities.

  • Extending English skill through activities.

  • Making ‘real-life’ observations (e.g. How many acute angles can you find around your home?).

  • Research for future lessons.

  • Preparation of presentations.

  • Revision-style exercises.

  • Children may take class work home to finish on occasions.

     

Role of school

  • To have a clear idea of when, why and how tasks will be given.

  • To set home learning regularly in accordance with guidelines.

  • To make home learning manageable, purposeful, clear and relevant.

  • To give feedback to parents and children.

  • To make parents aware of home learning policy and of any future alterations.

  • To build in an annual review of the policy.

To provide workshops to support parents with ways to help their children in home learning.

 

Role of Parent/Carer

  • To provide a ‘quiet’ suitable place for pupils to do home learning, either alone or with support.

  • To support pupils with specific requirements such as learning times tables, age-appropriate spellings and reading regularly.

  • To value home learning and support the school.

  • To encourage and praise pupils for completed work.

  • To communicate with the teacher if there are any concerns.

 

Role of Pupil

  • To be punctual in getting completed work back to school (before the deadline).

  • To ask for clarification or help on tasks set if necessary (before the deadline).

  • To complete home learning to the best possible level.

     

Role of Teacher

  • To include a designated time per week for discussing new home learning tasks.

  • Home learning will be clearly explained and modelled so that the children are sure what is required of them.

  • Home learning may be marked in lesson time as a collective exercise with the children or by a member of staff.

  • Home learning will be timetabled e.g. maths set on a Friday and due in the following Thursday (unless specifically stated by the teacher - with the exception of Learning Log menus which will be set at the beginning of a half term but will not be due in until the given date at the end of the half term).

  • All children are to have a home learning book and completed sheets are to be kept there as a record for parents.

  • Teachers will make themselves available so the children can get help with any home learning tasks they find difficult before they have to hand them in on Thursdays.

  • Teachers will ensure that pupils who do not complete and return their home learning on time, will complete some of their home learning during playtime whilst being supervised.

  • To provide children with passwords for Mathletics, Reading Eggs or other ICT-based home learning materials at the start of each year.

  • To produce home learning contracts for any child who repeatedly fails to return home learning on time.

     

General Advice

  • When practising spelling patterns it may be useful to use ‘Look, Say, Cover, Write, and Check’.Read the word – say it aloud – cover the word – write the word from memory. Repeat this sequence regularly.

     

  • Reading: the more the better! Children who read on a daily basis are more likely to see sustained progress with their reading. This includes children who are read to – research shows that children who are read to up to the age of 13 make significantly higher progress in English. If your child struggles on an occasional word please write it in the reading record book and practice it at the end of the session.If the book appears too easy or too difficult please let us know by writing a note in the reading record book.

 

  • Maths: The class teacher will always talk through one or two examples when the home learning is handed out on Fridays.If further help is needed the child must attend the home learning groups with their teacher at break time (before the homework deadline).

     

  • Tables: your child will be asked to learn both the multiplication and division tables and that one is the reverse of the other:

    e.g. 1 x 6 = 6     6  ÷  6 = 1,          2 x 6 = 12   12  ÷  6 = 2. 

    The class teacher will make it clear which type of table your child should be practising.

 

Home Learning Activities by year group

 

Reception and Year 1

  • Reading books: Reading must take place regularly (ten minutes on a daily basis) - we ask parents to hear and encourage their children’s reading and sign their record book. Supporting children may include helping children to use the pictures, blending new vocabulary using their phonics sounds and learning new tricky and high-frequency words. We also encourage the use of comprehension questions to ensure that children understand the content of what they read.

 

  • Literacy/Maths: One piece of Literacy or Maths per week. This will focus on skills that children have been learning in class that week. It should take ten minutes (no longer than 20 minutes maximum).

 

  • If necessary, individual advice is given to parents that highlights the specific need of their child.

 

  • Learning Logs: These will be sent home on a fortnightly basis and include a single task (or possibly a choice of tasks) which will relate to the topic which is being covered in class.

 

Year 3 and 4

  • Spellings: based on high-frequency, age-related word lists (provided for each child at the beginning of the year), word families or phonics. There will be no formal spelling test on a weekly basis, however, we would appreciate parental support for children with words from the list which they find tricky.

 

  • Reading books: Reading must take place regularly (preferably 15 minutes on a daily basis) - we ask parents to hear and encourage their children’s reading and sign their record book.Children can also be encouraged to read independently and to be able to choose from a variety of material e.g. newspapers, graphic novels, poetry, leaflets etc.

 

  • Maths: (should take no longer than thirty minutes, after which they should stop) - an activity that is linked to the maths learning covered that week.It may be times tables, a game, an ICT based activity, a home learning sheet or a real-life observation.

 

  • Learning Logs - At the beginning of a half term the children will be sent home with a set of tasks including English, maths, science and creative pieces. The children will be asked to complete three tasks of their own choice (from at least two different categories – e.g. two maths, one English or two creative, one science). Each task should take approximately an hour and a half. They will then have until the given date at the end of the half term to complete the three self-selected tasks, although they are welcome to bring them in to school earlier if they so wish.

     

Year 5 and 6

  • Spellings: based on high-frequency, age-related word lists (provided for each child at the beginning of the year), word families or phonics. There will be no formal spelling test on a weekly basis, however, we would appreciate parental support for children with words from the list which they find tricky.

 

  • Reading books: Reading must take place regularly (preferably 15 minutes on a daily basis) - we ask parents to hear and encourage their children’s reading and sign the record book.Children can also be encouraged to read independently and to be able to choose from a variety of material e.g. newspapers, graphic novels, poetry, leaflets etc. At the teacher’s discretion (where a child is a confident reader) the child may be asked to keep a ‘reading response diary’ where they will make notes, record thoughts and questions or create a synopsis of the reading they have done.

 

  • Maths: (should take no longer than forty five minutes, after which they should stop) - an activity that is linked to the maths learning covered that week.It may be times tables, a game, an ICT based activity, a home learning sheet or a real-life observation.

 

  • Learning Log Menus - At the beginning of a half term the children will be sent home with a set of tasks including English, maths, science and creative pieces. The children will be asked to complete three tasks of their own choice (from at least two different categories – e.g. two maths, one English or two creative, one science). Each task should take approximately an hour and a half. They will then have until the given date at the end of the half term to complete the three self-selected tasks, although they are welcome to bring them in to school earlier if they so wish.

 

  • Year 6 children will receive additional home learning to the above in preparation for their SATs.

 

Meeting specific individual needs

In relation to all of the above, where there is a specific need, children will be provided with home learning which is designed especially to support the individual. Details of this will be discussed with parents on an individual basis.

 

Further information

  • Reading records and reading diaries are checked in all year groups by staff every Thursday.If a child is not deemed to be reading regularly then they will be asked to catch-up that reading time in school. If this continues over a prolonged period then parents will be contacted.

     

  • If other home learning tasks are not handed in on time, the child will be given a reminder and chance to return it the following day.If it is not handed in the following day then the child will be asked to catch-up in school. If this continues over a prolonged period then parents will be contacted.

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